We are all sculptors and painters, and our material is our own flesh and blood and bones.
--Henry David Thoreau



To dance is to be.

Stay rooted, but always flow.




Betheny. 24. Vegan. Hooper.

Truth seeker. Space-time jumper.






Body modifications, veganism, art, knowledge, yoga, human rights, open-minds, peace, love, and BASS.




โ€œEmpty your mind, be formless... shapeless, like water. If you put water into a cup, it becomes the cup. You put water into a bottle; it becomes the bottle. You put it into a teapot; it becomes the teapot. Water can flowWWww or it can crash. Be water, my friend."

 

Had to repost ๐Ÿ’Ÿ๐Ÿ’–๐Ÿ’•๐Ÿ’ž๐Ÿ’๐Ÿ’˜๐Ÿ’—๐Ÿ’š๐Ÿ’›๐Ÿ’œ๐Ÿ’“โค๐Ÿ’™ #deadhead #forevergrateful

Had to repost ๐Ÿ’Ÿ๐Ÿ’–๐Ÿ’•๐Ÿ’ž๐Ÿ’๐Ÿ’˜๐Ÿ’—๐Ÿ’š๐Ÿ’›๐Ÿ’œ๐Ÿ’“โค๐Ÿ’™ #deadhead #forevergrateful

#throwbackwheneveriwant one of my favorite shots ever. No filter, no edits, just pure beauty. I’ve seen some truly stunning sunsets here :) โคโค๐ŸŒ„๐ŸŒ„๐ŸŒ„๐ŸŒ…๐ŸŒ…๐ŸŒ… #hooplove #yogalove #silhouette #love

#throwbackwheneveriwant one of my favorite shots ever. No filter, no edits, just pure beauty. I’ve seen some truly stunning sunsets here :) โคโค๐ŸŒ„๐ŸŒ„๐ŸŒ„๐ŸŒ…๐ŸŒ…๐ŸŒ… #hooplove #yogalove #silhouette #love

Sometimes ya goooooottaaaaa ๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™

Sometimes ya goooooottaaaaa ๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ™

#repost from @conspiracy_psychedelicasaurus ๐Ÿ’•๐Ÿ’•๐Ÿ’•๐Ÿ’•

#repost from @conspiracy_psychedelicasaurus ๐Ÿ’•๐Ÿ’•๐Ÿ’•๐Ÿ’•

They call me the RAWvarine, come at me and I’ll be like, ‘wanna smoke about it’!?
#vegan #nongmo #bleachfree #rawlife #rawunrefined #naturalfibers #glutenfree #windpowered #natural #rawpapersovereverything #rawpapers #knowwhatyousmoke #smokenaturally #rawthentic #rawpapers #rawlife247 #goodgirlslikeitRAW

They call me the RAWvarine, come at me and I’ll be like, ‘wanna smoke about it’!?
#vegan #nongmo #bleachfree #rawlife #rawunrefined #naturalfibers #glutenfree #windpowered #natural #rawpapersovereverything #rawpapers #knowwhatyousmoke #smokenaturally #rawthentic #rawpapers #rawlife247 #goodgirlslikeitRAW

Keep one, or five, rolled. Its going to be a fantastic day off for me :) #vegan #nongmo #bleachfree #rawlife #rawunrefined #naturalfibers #glutenfree #windpowered #natural #rawpapersovereverything #rawpapers #knowwhatyousmoke #smokenaturally #rawthentic #rawpapers #rawlife247 #goodgirlslikeitRAW

Keep one, or five, rolled. Its going to be a fantastic day off for me :) #vegan #nongmo #bleachfree #rawlife #rawunrefined #naturalfibers #glutenfree #windpowered #natural #rawpapersovereverything #rawpapers #knowwhatyousmoke #smokenaturally #rawthentic #rawpapers #rawlife247 #goodgirlslikeitRAW


Legal Experiments on LSD Have Commenced
Dr. Robin Carhart-Harris is the first person in the UK to legally experiment with LSD, and he’s about to clear away the misconceptions the drug has faced for more than 50 years
Dr. Robin Carhart-Harris has boldly gone where no man has gone in over 40 years: he is the first person in the UK to have legally administered doses of LSD to human volunteers since the Misuse of Drugs Act of 1971.
Dr. Carhart-Harris, a research associate in the Centre for Neuropsychopharmacology at Imperial College, presented his research at a public talk in June. The centerpiece of his presentation was a slid showing a cross-sectional image of the brain of a volunteer who was in an fMRI while under the influence of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD). Blotches of color indicate changes in blood flow to specific regions of the brain, from which can be inferred changes in level of activity in those regions. In the case of Dr. Carhart-Harris’ subject, activity levels were notably altered in the hippo-campus—the part of the brain involved in making memories and giving them context.
“We’ve only looked in six brains so far,” Dr. Carhart-Harris told The Independent. “We’re at an early, but certainly promising, stage. It’s really exciting.”
The scientific potential of psychedelics generally fall within two categories: they have appear to have medical or therapeutic value as well as offer an unconventional perspective on the workings of the human mind, potentially making the so-called “hard problem of consciousness” a little easier. Plant-derived psychedelics such as mescaline, psilocybin and DMT have been used therapeutically and medicinally by indigenous peoples for millennia.
But LSD is different. It wasn’t discovered in the Amazon rain forest or the mountains of southern Mexico. It was discovered in a pharmaceutical laboratory in Switzerland. It was discovered in 1943 after Albert Hoffman, a 37-year-old chemist employed by the Sandoz pharmaceutical company in Basel, accidentally ingested a chemical he had synthesized from the ergot fungus through his fingertips, thus demarcating the first acid trip in human history.
The substance is unique in that it is extremely potent in minute doses, and because of what Dr. Carhart-Harris calls “a very favorable physiological safety profile”—which is to say that it is virtually non-toxic—the newly synthesized psychedelic wiped clean a great many doors of perception. And not only for generations of Deadheads, but more specifically for avenues of scientific research.
“You could say the birth of the science of psychedelics occurred with the discovery of LSD,” said Dr. Carhart-Harris. “It was only then that we started to study them systematically.”
By 1947, Sandoz was promoting LSD under the brand name Delysid as a tool for psychotherapy. There were more than 1,000 clinical papers discussing 40,000 patients published between the 1950s and 1965, the year that Sandoz withdrew the drug. A 2012 meta-analysis of six controlled trials from the era found LSD’s clinical efficiency for the treatment of alcoholism to be as effective as any treatment since developed. Alcoholics Anonymous founder Bill Wilson is even said to have experimented with the drug.
“I personally think it has a great deal of potential for treating addiction,” said Dr. Carhart-Harris. “It’s slightly hypothetical, but it’s based on what we know about the way the brain works, which is that it settles into configurations of activity that seem to underlay certain psychopathologies.
“Depression and addictions rest on reinforced patterns of brain activity, and a psychedelic will introduce a relative chaos. Patterns that have become reinforced disintegrate under the drug. I’ve used the metaphor of shaking a snowglobe. And there’s some evidence that psychedelics induce plasticity, in terms of neural connections in the brain, such that there is a window of opportunity in which connections can either be broken or reinforced. New things can be learnt at the same time that old things can be unlearnt. It induces a kind of suppleness of mind.”
The doctor wishes to distinguish the paradigms of scientific research and recreational use.
“The model for how the drugs are taken therapeutically is very different from how people might take them recreationally,” he said. “People are in a particularly sensitive and vulnerable state on psychedelics, and I do think you need that professionalism and structure to have it done properly.”
Dr. Carhart-Harris also administers doses that are lower than a typical recreational dose. He insists, however, that the experience is no less vivid.
“When people take psychedelics recreationally, in a social context,” he said, “they might get preoccupied by the perceptual changes and the novelty, and they’ll laugh their way through with a certain amount of confusion and anxiety. But in an experimental context, particularly in the therapeutic context, people lie on a couch with their eyes closed and have a very introspective experience. It’s richer; psychologically, it’s more interesting. Without distractions, emotions and memories are more likely to emerge spontaneously. There is a possibility of having quite vivid recollections of past experiences, such that they’re not past any more and can be re-experienced in the present. It gets very interesting when people start describing where they’re going in their minds. It’s the kind of stuff you just wouldn’t hear ordinarily.”
The doctor also makes use of music in both the therapeutic and brain-imaging studies.
“People typically play classical music in psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy,” says Carhart-Harris, “But we’re going with some relaxing ambient stuff, particularly in the setting of a noisy MRI scanner. We’re also looking at the interaction between music and LSD; seeing whether emotional arousal and ego dissolution are enhanced. The theory—and it is only a theory… is that the music can do a number of things. It can have a steadying influence, but it can also help facilitate emotional release.”
Caution is still a preeminent watchword with psychedelics. The classic dictum of “set and setting” remains as relevant today as they did in Leary’s day.
“The dangers with psychedelics—and there are potential dangers—arise when they are taken without the proper caution,” Dr. Carhart-Harris said.
As the potential for scientific research becomes clear, there are still many legal hurtles that psychedelic research faces.
“Psychedelics are polarizing,” said the doctor, “and people are opposed to them because they’re threatening. But science is an exercise in honesty, really. That’s its great merit. And if you want to understand reality better, then you have to confront things that might be difficult.”
In the video below, Dr. Robin Carhart-Harris discusses how psychedelics affect the brain.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U5ifWcdEpCA

Legal Experiments on LSD Have Commenced

Dr. Robin Carhart-Harris is the first person in the UK to legally experiment with LSD, and heโ€™s about to clear away the misconceptions the drug has faced for more than 50 years

Dr. Robin Carhart-Harris has boldly gone where no man has gone in over 40 years: he is the first person in the UK to have legally administered doses of LSD to human volunteers since the Misuse of Drugs Act of 1971.

Dr. Carhart-Harris, a research associate in the Centre for Neuropsychopharmacology at Imperial College, presented his research at a public talk in June. The centerpiece of his presentation was a slid showing a cross-sectional image of the brain of a volunteer who was in an fMRI while under the influence of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD). Blotches of color indicate changes in blood flow to specific regions of the brain, from which can be inferred changes in level of activity in those regions. In the case of Dr. Carhart-Harrisโ€™ subject, activity levels were notably altered in the hippo-campusโ€”the part of the brain involved in making memories and giving them context.

โ€œWeโ€™ve only looked in six brains so far,โ€ Dr. Carhart-Harris told The Independent. โ€œWeโ€™re at an early, but certainly promising, stage. Itโ€™s really exciting.โ€

The scientific potential of psychedelics generally fall within two categories: they have appear to have medical or therapeutic value as well as offer an unconventional perspective on the workings of the human mind, potentially making the so-called โ€œhard problem of consciousnessโ€ a little easier. Plant-derived psychedelics such as mescaline, psilocybin and DMT have been used therapeutically and medicinally by indigenous peoples for millennia.

But LSD is different. It wasnโ€™t discovered in the Amazon rain forest or the mountains of southern Mexico. It was discovered in a pharmaceutical laboratory in Switzerland. It was discovered in 1943 after Albert Hoffman, a 37-year-old chemist employed by the Sandoz pharmaceutical company in Basel, accidentally ingested a chemical he had synthesized from the ergot fungus through his fingertips, thus demarcating the first acid trip in human history.

The substance is unique in that it is extremely potent in minute doses, and because of what Dr. Carhart-Harris calls โ€œa very favorable physiological safety profileโ€โ€”which is to say that it is virtually non-toxicโ€”the newly synthesized psychedelic wiped clean a great many doors of perception. And not only for generations of Deadheads, but more specifically for avenues of scientific research.

โ€œYou could say the birth of the science of psychedelics occurred with the discovery of LSD,โ€ said Dr. Carhart-Harris. โ€œIt was only then that we started to study them systematically.โ€

By 1947, Sandoz was promoting LSD under the brand name Delysid as a tool for psychotherapy. There were more than 1,000 clinical papers discussing 40,000 patients published between the 1950s and 1965, the year that Sandoz withdrew the drug. A 2012 meta-analysis of six controlled trials from the era found LSDโ€™s clinical efficiency for the treatment of alcoholism to be as effective as any treatment since developed. Alcoholics Anonymous founder Bill Wilson is even said to have experimented with the drug.

โ€œI personally think it has a great deal of potential for treating addiction,โ€ said Dr. Carhart-Harris. โ€œItโ€™s slightly hypothetical, but itโ€™s based on what we know about the way the brain works, which is that it settles into configurations of activity that seem to underlayย certain psychopathologies.

โ€œDepression and addictions rest on reinforced patterns of brain activity, and a psychedelic will introduce a relative chaos. Patterns that have become reinforced disintegrate under the drug. Iโ€™ve used the metaphor of shaking a snowglobe. And thereโ€™s some evidence that psychedelics induce plasticity, in terms of neural connections in the brain, such that there is a window of opportunity in which connections can either be broken or reinforced. New things can be learnt at the same time that old things can be unlearnt. It induces a kind of suppleness of mind.โ€

The doctor wishes to distinguish the paradigms of scientific research and recreational use.

โ€œThe model for how the drugs are taken therapeutically is very different from how people might take them recreationally,โ€ he said. โ€œPeople are in a particularly sensitive and vulnerable state on psychedelics, and I do think you need that professionalism and structure to have it done properly.โ€

Dr. Carhart-Harris also administers doses that are lower than a typical recreational dose. He insists, however, that the experience is no less vivid.

โ€œWhen people take psychedelics recreationally, in a social context,โ€ he said, โ€œthey might get preoccupied by the perceptual changes and the novelty, and theyโ€™ll laugh their way through with a certain amount of confusion and anxiety. But in an experimental context, particularly in the therapeutic context, people lie on a couch with their eyes closed and have a very introspective experience. Itโ€™s richer; psychologically, itโ€™s more interesting. Without distractions, emotions and memories are more likely to emerge spontaneously. There is a possibility of having quite vivid recollections of past experiences, such that theyโ€™re not past any more and can be re-experienced in the present. It gets very interesting when people start describing where theyโ€™re going in their minds. Itโ€™s the kind of stuff you just wouldnโ€™t hear ordinarily.โ€

The doctor also makes use of music in both the therapeutic and brain-imaging studies.

โ€œPeople typically play classical music in psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy,โ€ says Carhart-Harris, โ€œBut weโ€™re going with some relaxing ambient stuff, particularly in the setting of a noisy MRI scanner. Weโ€™re also looking at the interaction between music and LSD; seeing whether emotional arousal and ego dissolution are enhanced. The theoryโ€”and it is only a theoryโ€ฆ is that the music can do a number of things. It can have a steadying influence, but it can also help facilitate emotional release.โ€

Caution is still a preeminent watchword with psychedelics. The classic dictum of โ€œset and settingโ€ remains as relevant today as they did in Learyโ€™s day.

โ€œThe dangers with psychedelicsโ€”and there are potential dangersโ€”arise when they are taken without the proper caution,โ€ Dr. Carhart-Harris said.

As the potential for scientific research becomes clear, there are still many legal hurtles that psychedelic research faces.

โ€œPsychedelics are polarizing,โ€ said the doctor, โ€œand people are opposed to them because theyโ€™re threatening. But science is an exercise in honesty, really. Thatโ€™s its great merit. And if you want to understand reality better, then you have to confront things that might be difficult.โ€

In the video below, Dr. Robin Carhart-Harris discusses how psychedelics affect the brain.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U5ifWcdEpCA

(Source: mylittlerewolution)

18mr:

โ€œWhen thinking of iconic romance, ask yourself if any imagery (paintings, photographs, film-stills) comes to mind that is not showing heterosexual couples? Probably not,โ€ says photographer Braden Summers of his photo series of everyday gay and lesbian couples from around the globe.

[x]

Anonymous asked
This is a strange question, but maybe you know the answer? My great-grandpa's US naturalization certificate (we have the original) has some corrections on it that are curious to say the least. If you look closely at the paper you can see how his physical description was changed, from "dark" complexion to "white". This was around 1920, he came from Czechoslovakia. Are such errors common? Afaik we're all white, I don't remember my great-grandparents much...

whatwhiteswillneverknow:

heyheyitistaytay:

whatwhiteswillneverknow:

Soโ€ฆ Who wants to take this one? Because I donโ€™t have the foggiest.

So around that time, immigration in the U.S. was heavily regulated to only allow โ€œwhiteโ€ persons into the country. The courts at the time had a way of determining whether someone was white or not. This was done by two methods. The first was a sort of โ€œcommon senseโ€ approach and the other was based on science (using that term loosely). So if someone who was Indian wanted to immigrate to the U.S, but was not considered โ€œwhiteโ€ then they could challenge that decision. You can actually look this stuff up, and it is kinda interesting. Say if Mr. Morgan wanted to go to the U.S. and he was Indian. The U.S. at the time might have said โ€œNo wayโ€. He could take that decision to the courts and challenge it saying โ€œI am white because of x, y, or z.โ€ If the courts agreed with him, they would allow him into the country and from there on consider any Indians as white people. However, the courts were known to go back and change their decisions by saying โ€œWell, no reasonable person would consider an Indian as white because of x, y, or z.โ€ Or like, โ€œscience shows that Indians are not white.โ€ So then Mr. Morgan and any other Indians wouldnโ€™t been allowed into the country. So if your great granddad was from Czechoslovakia, then there was probably a point when the U.S. did not consider Czechoslovakians as white people then changed that decision later on in history. I remember learning this in my Race class last year and I might have messed up some details but that is basically the gist. Itโ€™s pretty crazy what was considered โ€œwhiteโ€ by the U.S. government and what wasnโ€™t.

Ever read something and go <sarcasm> โ€œoh, wellโ€ฆ all of this sounds like something America will NEVER do.โ€ </sarcasm>

And then you decided to look up things like the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 and realized that only then can people from Asia, Africa, and the Middle East can freely migrate to the US.

And then before you realize it, not only you learn something new, but you now have a weapon to use when people say that โ€œracism canโ€™t be written into lawโ€.

But to sweeten the deal of this fact, the bill was introduced when your father was in High School.ย 

Those who donโ€™t know history are doomed to repeat it.ย 

*fake laughs to cover up the cries*